Expert Interview Series: Martha Amram on Creating a Personalized Energy Plan

Energy plan

Whether you want to live greener, save money on your energy bill, or both, now is the time to consider a personalized energy plan.

WattzOn would be happy to help you out. They’ll help create a personalized plan for saving energy in your home – one that is tailored to local climates, local rates, your house, and your lifestyle.

“If one-size-fits-all really worked, then utility brochures would have gotten the job done,” says CEO Martha Amram. “But in fact, every home is different and so is every family.”

Martha says they’ve saved users around $240 a year on their utility bills with low-cost or no-cost changes alone. Some plans offer 40 to 60 percent savings off of utility bills.

We recently asked Martha a few questions about why homeowners should care about reducing energy and water use in their home, and how they can to it with the fewest headaches. Here’s what she had to say:

What are the benefits of reduced energy and water use to the homeowner and the community at large?

The homeowner saves money and meets local watering restrictions. Communities want to reduce their footprint, but have a very difficult time engaging residents. WattzOn is part of the solution.

What’s the best way for homeowners to conduct an audit of their energy and water use?

We’re not fond of the word “audit.” It sounds as fun as taxes and a visit to the dentist. We use the phrase “fitbit your home,” meaning get the data to make your home energy use transparent and actionable, get the software tools to track your result, and make it pleasant. That’s WattzOn’s approach: the same great results as an online “audit” – just much more engaging.

What are the most common energy wasters in a home?

1. Lights (Get LED!)
2. Heating/Cooling (Get a smart thermostat! Being able to read how your energy is being used as it’s used is important!)
3. Older Refrigerators
4. Older Washer
5. Older cable TV boxes (If yours is more than four years old, you should change it!)

What about ways water is overused at home?

Surprisingly, the most water is wasted/overused outside, with lawn and outdoor watering needed to maintain gardens and landscaping. A lot of water can be saved by automating irrigation systems and keeping track of how often and what time of day you’re watering.

What are some low-cost ways homeowners can make their homes more energy efficient?

It’s easier than people think to start making their home more energy efficient. These three things alone will make a big difference:

1. Turn off the lights
2. Don’t heat or cool an empty home
3. Use a smart thermostat

What should homeowners consider investing in to reduce energy and/or water use in the long term?

Frankly, few homeowners make investments for the long term. Most fix things as the need arises. So our suggestion is that when your water heater or furnace fails, replace it with a high-efficiency model. There’s no need to worry about investments in general; just make a great decision at the time of replacement. And don’t forget to check local rebates.

What energy saving innovations are you most excited about right now?

We’re really excited by the long-term savings consumers can create for themselves by investing in solar and reducing their electricity use. It’s pretty easy to cut your electricity bill in half or to even get close to zero.

How do you think home design will change in the future to reflect the growing interest in green living and renewable energy?

Due to stringent building codes, new homes in California are already meeting this need: super insulated, efficient systems, solar, and low water use. Most of them have smart thermostats as well. The data show that “green homes” sell faster than standard homes. The future is happening now!

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Start improving your home’s energy efficiency through The Mass Save Home Energy Services Program from Moonworks. Call 1-800-975-6666 today to schedule your assessment.

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